New Fiction Arrivals

Posted on: Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 3:00:00 pm

Here's a sampling of our new fiction arrivals. Click an image to view availability or place a hold.

Bad Moms (Rated R)

Bad Moms (Rated R)

Three overstressed, overworked mothers (Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell, and Kathryn Hahn) decide to blow off their responsibilities and have some fun, but their wild ways cause them to clash with a rival mommy (Christina Applegate) who's dedicated to preserving the facade of her perfect life. Jada Pinkett Smithco-stars. Written and directed by Jon Lucas and Scott Moore.*

The BFG (Rated PG)

The BFG (Rated PG)

Steven Spielberg directed this adaptation of Roald Dahl's beloved novel, which centers on the unlikely friendship between a lonely orphan named Sophie (Ruby Barnhill) and the titular "big friendly giant" (brought to life via a motion-capture performance from Mark Rylance). Together, the pair explore Giant Country and collect dreams; later, they try to warn the Queen of England (Penelope Wilton) about the threat posed by the other giants, who, unlike the vegetarian BFG, eat children for sustenance.*

Hell or High Water (Rated R)

Hell or High Water (Rated R)

Two desperate brothers -- one a divorced father (Chris Pine), the other a hard-living ex-con (Ben Foster) -- commit a string of bank robberies in order to raise the money needed to protect their family farm from foreclosure. Meanwhile, an aging sheriff (Jeff Bridges) tracks the heists in an attempt to hunt down those responsible. This crime drama was written by Taylor Sheridan (Sicario) and directed by David Mackenzie (Starred Up).*

Moonglow by Michael Chabon

Moonglow by Michael Chabon

In 1989, fresh from the publication of his first novel, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Michael Chabon traveled to his mother’s home in Oakland, California, to visit his terminally ill grandfather. Tongue loosened by powerful painkillers, memory stirred by the imminence of death, Chabon’s grandfather shared recollections and told stories the younger man had never heard before, uncovering bits and pieces of a history long buried and forgotten. That dreamlike week of revelations forms the basis for the novel Moonglow, the latest feat of legerdemain from Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Chabon.

 Moonglow unfolds as the deathbed confession of a man the narrator refers to only as “my grandfather.” It is a tale of madness, of war and adventure, of sex and marriage and desire, of existential doubt and model rocketry, of the shining aspirations and demonic underpinnings of American technological accomplishment at midcentury, and, above all, of the destructive impact—and the creative power—of keeping secrets and telling lies. It is a portrait of the difficult but passionate love between the narrator’s grandfather and his grandmother, an enigmatic woman broken by her experience growing up in war-torn France. It is also a tour de force of speculative autobiography in which Chabon devises and reveals a secret history of his own imagination.

From the Jewish slums of prewar South Philadelphia to the invasion of Germany, from a Florida retirement village to the penal utopia of New York’s Wallkill prison, from the heyday of the space program to the twilight of the “American Century,” the novel revisits an entire era through a single life and collapses a lifetime into a single week. A lie that tells the truth, a work of fictional nonfiction, an autobiography wrapped in a novel disguised as a memoir, Moonglow is Chabon at his most moving and inventive.

Pete's Dragon (Rated PG)

Pete's Dragon (Rated PG)

After his parents are killed in a car accident, a young boy named Pete (Oakes Fegley) finds an unlikely caregiver in the form of a dragon (whom he dubs "Elliot") living in a forest in the Pacific Northwest. Years later, a forest ranger (Bryce Dallas Howard) discovers Pete and takes him in, but his attempts to adjust to a normal life are complicated by a man (Karl Urban) who wants to hunt down Elliot. Wes Bentley, Oona Laurence, and Robert Redford co-star. Directed by David Lowery (Ain't Them Bodies Saints), Pete's Dragon is a remake of the 1977 children's movie of the same name.*

Prince Lestat and the Realms of Atlantis by Anne Rice

Prince Lestat and the Realms of Atlantis by Anne Rice

At the novel's center: the vampire Lestat de Lioncourt, hero, leader, inspirer, irresistible force, irrepressible spirit, battling (and ultimately reconciling with) a strange otherworldly form that has somehow taken possession of Lestat's undead body and soul. This ancient and mysterious power and unearthly spirit of vampire lore has all the force, history, and insidious reach of the unknowable Universe.

It is through this spirit, previously considered benign for thousands of vampire years and throughout the Vampire Chronicles, that we come to be told the hypnotic tale of a great sea power of ancient times; a mysterious heaven on earth situated on a boundless continent--and of how and why, and in what manner and with what far-reaching purpose, this force came to build and rule the great legendary empire of centuries ago that thrived in the Atlantic Ocean.

And as we learn of the mighty, far-reaching powers and perfections of this lost kingdom of Atalantaya, the lost realms of Atlantis, we come to understand its secrets, and how and why the vampire Lestat, indeed all the vampires, must reckon so many millennia later with the terrifying force of this ageless, all-powerful Atalantaya spirit.

When All the Girls Have Gone by Jayne Ann Krentz

When All the Girls Have Gone by Jayne Ann Krentz

When Charlotte Sawyer is unable to contact her stepsister, Jocelyn, to tell her that one of her closest friends was found dead, she discovers that Jocelyn has vanished. 
 
Beautiful, brilliant—and reckless—Jocelyn has gone off the grid before, but never like this. In a desperate effort to find her, Charlotte joins forces with Max Cutler, a struggling PI who recently moved to Seattle after his previous career as a criminal profiler went down in flames—literally. Burned out, divorced and almost broke, Max needs the job.  
 
After surviving a near-fatal attack, Charlotte and Max turn to Jocelyn’s closest friends, women in a Seattle-based online investment club, for answers. But what they find is chilling...
 
When her uneasy alliance with Max turns into a full-blown affair, Charlotte has no choice but to trust him with her life. For the shadows of Jocelyn’s past are threatening to consume her—and anyone else who gets in their way...

Whole Town's Talking by Fannie Flagg

Whole Town's Talking by Fannie Flagg

Elmwood Springs, Missouri, is a small town like any other, but something strange is happening at the cemetery. Still Meadows, as it’s called, is anything but still. Original, profound, The Whole Town’s Talking, a novel in the tradition of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town and Flagg’s own Can’t Wait to Get to Heaven, tells the story of Lordor Nordstrom, his Swedish mail-order bride, Katrina, and their neighbors and descendants as they live, love, die, and carry on in mysterious and surprising ways.

Lordor Nordstrom created, in his wisdom, not only a lively town and a prosperous legacy for himself but also a beautiful final resting place for his family, friends, and neighbors yet to come. “Resting place” turns out to be a bit of a misnomer, however. Odd things begin to happen, and it starts the whole town talking.

With her wild imagination, great storytelling, and deep understanding of folly and the human heart, the beloved Fannie Flagg tells an unforgettable story of life, afterlife, and the remarkable goings-on of ordinary people. In The Whole Town’s Talking, she reminds us that community is vital, life is a gift, and love never dies.

Item descriptions from Amazon. *Item descriptions from All Movie Guide.

comments powered by Disqus