New Nonfiction Arrivals

Posted on: Monday, July 21, 2014 at 12:00:00 pm

Here's a sampling of our new nonfiction arrivals. Click an image to view availability or place a hold.

Behind the Curtain: An Insider's View of Jay Leno's Tonight Show

Behind the Curtain: An Insider's View of Jay Leno's Tonight Show by Dave Berg

Jay Leno's Tonight Show comes alive in this book by insider Dave Berg, who spent 18 years as Jay's co-producer.  There were always two shows: the one on stage and the one behind the curtain. This narrative weaves both together, featuring the show's most legendary moments, including Hugh Grant's game-changing mea culpa, Arnold Schwarzenegger's shocking political announcement, and the historic booking of Barack Obama as the first sitting president ever to do a late-night show. But it doesn't stop there.  Every page is full of zany, wacky and serious moments with celebrities, political and sports figures at The Tonight Show with Jay Leno. Foreword by Jay Leno and endorsements by Laura Bush, Bill O'Reilly, Bill Maher,  Gary Sinise, James Carville & Mary Matalin, Larry the Cable Guy and more.

Double Agent: The First Hero of World War II and How the FBI Outwitted and Destroyed a Nazi Spy Ring

Double Agent: The First Hero of World War II and How the FBI Outwitted and Destroyed a Nazi Spy Ring by Peter Duffy

The never-before-told tale of the German-American who spearheaded a covert mission to infiltrate New York’s Nazi underground in the days leading up to World War II—the most successful counterespionage operation in US history.

From the time Adolf Hitler came into power in 1933, German spies were active in New York. In 1937, a German national living in Queens stole the blueprints for the country’s most precious secret, the Norden Bombsight, delivering them to the German military two years before World War II started in Europe and four years before the US joined the fight. When the FBI uncovered a ring of Nazi spies in the city, President Franklin Roosevelt formally declared J. Edgar Hoover as America’s spymaster with responsibility for overseeing all investigations. As war began in Europe in 1939, a naturalized German-American was recruited by the Nazis to set up a radio transmitter and collect messages from spies active in the city to send back to Nazi spymasters in Hamburg. This German-American, William G. Sebold, approached the FBI and became the first double agent in the Bureau’s history, the center of a sixteen-month investigation that led to the arrest of a colorful cast of thirty-three enemy agents, among them a South African adventurer with an exotic accent and a monocle and a Jewish femme fatale, Lilly Stein, who escaped Nazi Vienna by offering to seduce US military men into whispering secrets into her ear.

Jodorowsky's Dune

Jodorowsky's Dune (PG-13)

Filmmaker Frank Pavich explores one of cinema's great "what ifs" in this documentary detailing Alejandro Jodorowsky's aborted feature adaptation of Frank Herbert's celebrated sci-fi novel Dune. With the release of El Topo (1970) and its psychedelic follow-up The Holy Mountain (1973), Jodorowsky became not only a pioneer of psychedelic surrealism in film, but also the father of the "Midnight Movie." Following the success of those two films, the Chilean director began focusing all of his energies on translating Dune to the big screen. The film was to star Jodorowsky's own son Brontis along with a stunning cast that included Orson Welles, David Carradine, Mick Jagger, and Salvador Dali, with Pink Floyd providing the score, and art direction by H.R. Giger and Jean "Moebius" Giraud. Two years into the massive production, however, the film was suddenly and unceremoniously cancelled. Yet even today, numerous relics of that ambitious production -- including thousands of enticingly vivid storyboards -- still exist. In this film, Pavich offers movie lovers a tantalizing glimpse at a masterpiece that was never meant to be.*

Also available on Blu-Ray.

Leave It To Beavers

Leave It To Beavers (Not Rated)

The fascinating story of beavers in North America - their history, near extinction, and current comeback, as a growing number of scientists, conservationists and grass-roots environmentalists have come to regard beavers as overlooked tools when it comes to reversing the disastrous effects of global warming and world-wide water shortages.**

Locked Up In America

Locked Up In America (PG-13)

For decades, the United States has been fixated on incarceration, building prisons and locking up more and more people. But at what cost, and has it really made a difference? FRONTLINE goes to the epicenter of the raging debate about incarceration in America, focusing on the controversial practice of solitary confinement and on new efforts to reduce the prison population, as officials are rethinking what to do with criminals.**

mirage men

Mirage Men (Not Rated)

A look at the disinformation movement aimed at obscuring the facts about UFOs and extraterrestrial visitors, the explosive documentary Mirage Men elaborates on ideas originally put forth in the book Mirage Men: An Adventure into Paranoia, Espionage, Psychological Warfare, and UFOs. Here, filmmakers Mark Pilkington and John Lundberg offer a compelling look at how counter intelligence methods employed by the U.S. Air Force and various intelligence agencies inexplicably gave rise to an entire mythology capable of warping the perception of even the best and brightest in the scientific community.*

Tomlinson Hill

Tomlinson Hill: The Remarkable Story of Two Families Who Share the Tomlinson Name -- One White, One Black by Chris Tomlinson

Internationally recognized for his work as a fearless war correspondent, award-winning journalist Chris Tomlinson grew up hearing stories about his family’s abandoned cotton plantation in Falls County, Texas. Most of the tales lionized his white ancestors for pioneering along the Brazos River. His grandfather often said the family’s slaves loved them so much that they also took Tomlinson as their last name. 

LaDainian Tomlinson, football great and former running back for the San Diego Chargers, spent part of his childhood playing on the same land that his black ancestors had worked as slaves. As a child, LaDainian believed the Hill was named after his family. Not until he was old enough to read an historical plaque did he realize that the Hill was named for his ancestor’s slaveholders.

A masterpiece of authentic American history, Tomlinson Hill traces the true and very revealing story of these two families. From the beginning in 1854— when the first Tomlinson, a white woman, arrived—to 2007, when the last Tomlinson, LaDainian’s father, left,  the book unflinchingly explores the history of race and bigotry in Texas. Along the way it also manages to disclose a great many untruths that are latent in the unsettling and complex story of America.

The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens' London

The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens' London by Judith Flanders

The nineteenth century was a time of unprecedented change, and nowhere was this more apparent than London. In only a few decades, the capital grew from a compact Regency town into a sprawling metropolis of 6.5 million inhabitants, the largest city the world had ever seen. Technology—railways, street-lighting, and sewers—transformed both the city and the experience of city-living, as London expanded in every direction. Now Judith Flanders, one of Britain’s foremost social historians, explores the world portrayed so vividly in Dickens’ novels, showing life on the streets of London in colorful, fascinating detail.

From the moment Charles Dickens, the century's best-loved English novelist and London's greatest observer, arrived in the city in 1822, he obsessively walked its streets, recording its pleasures, curiosities and cruelties. Now, with him, Judith Flanders leads us through the markets, transport systems, sewers, rivers, slums, alleys, cemeteries, gin palaces, chop-houses and entertainment emporia of Dickens' London, to reveal the Victorian capital in all its variety, vibrancy, and squalor. From the colorful cries of street-sellers to the uncomfortable reality of travel by omnibus, to the many uses for the body parts of dead horses and the unimaginably grueling working days of hawker children, no detail is too small, or too strange. No one who reads Judith Flanders's meticulously researched, captivatingly written The Victorian City will ever view London in the same light again.

Item descriptions from Amazon. *Item descriptions from All Movie Guide. **Item descriptions from PBS.

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